Welcome to the Spectrum

theautismspectrumWelcome to the Spectrum is a community engagement campaign aimed at growing the understanding of autism and neurodiversity within the Waterloo Region.  We want to move beyond awareness to understanding, inclusion, and belonging, to make the Waterloo Region a better place for people living with autism.

For more information about why we chose the image above to represent the campaign, click here.

As part of Autism ‘Understanding’ Month in April, ASWR hosts our annual Welcome to the Spectrum Breakfast for change makers.  Check out these videos that were featured at the Breakfast this year.

Steve Silberman: The forgotten history of autism

Autism: See the Potential

Autism at Work: Shifting Perception of People’s Abilities – Matthew’s Story

Specialisterne

As part of our community engagement campaign we are collecting #AutismStoriesWR aimed at deepening our understanding of autism by exploring and celebrating our diversity! Please scroll through the stories below – real people from Waterloo Region have submitted their stories in order to help others fully understand autism.

  • Awareness Super Development

    About a week ago, I read an article titled (we are not aware enough), it was written by a mother of a child with ASD, she was describing her daily life with him, she was talking about the obstacles which she couldn’t overcome, in her article she puts blame on media because it always talking […]

    Read story
  • If could change things..

    I always hear people say “I would never change anything about my child”, and I think “you really, truly wouldn’t???” I never understood that. Because I would in a heartbeat. If I could change things, I would make my son “normal”. I would take his autism away. Just because I say that does not mean […]

    Read story
  • Fox and Brayden

    I AM BRAYDEN. I AM EIGHT YEARS OLD. I HAVE TWO SISTERS AND A SERVICE DOG NAMED GUSTO.  I CAME UP WITH THIS LIST WITH MY BEST FRIEND FOX. WE BOTH HAVE AUTISM AND ARE NON VERBAL.  WE USE RAPID PROMPTING METHOD (RPM) TO TALK. WE CAME UP WITH THE MISCONCEPTIONS LIST BECAUSE WE WANTED TO INFORM PEOPLE […]

    Read story
  • IBI may stand for intensive behavioral intervention, but to our family it stands for I BELIEVE IT!

    When our child was diagnosed with ASD at the age of 2 ½ we felt lost, not sure what of the journey we were about to take. We were overwhelmed with all the paper work and all the people we met for all the different programs. When our child was 3, she still could not […]

    Read story
  • Carpe diem. Look inwards and learn

    We have three bright, beautiful, smart, talented, granddaughters and one young toddling grandson. They laugh (a lot), they play (a lot), they love music, they dance, they sing. One has aspergers. Every time we’re together she teaches us something about herself and ourselves. When things go badly she tests our assumptions and makes us dig […]

    Read story
  • Think Big!

    Welcome to the spectrum . Finally. What a perfect opportunity to consider the full spectrum of behavioral diversity; this is a great launching pad for accepting diversity across the spectrum of humanness. Does it matter if it’s autism, aspergers, pdd-nos, fasd, adhd, turrets, general anxiety disorder, depression, acquired brain injury, etc.? Be curious. Be empathetic. […]

    Read story
Share Your Story!

Ask

Call, email or come in

Donate

Help us reach more families

Subscribe

Join our Autism Bulletin
Mailing List

FAQ

I think I/my child may be on the autism spectrum. Where can I get an assessment?

Below are some options for getting an assessment for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Eligibility and cost varies with each option.

Who can help me to advocate for myself/my child within the school system?

The following agencies/organizations can assist you in navigating the education system and advocating for yourself or your child:

Who can help me/my child with mental health concerns (i.e. anxiety, stress/coping)?

Here are some services in our community that can assist with mental health concerns:

Are there any supports for people who don’t have a diagnosis of ASD yet?

Below are some resources that you may find useful prior to receiving a formal diagnosis of ASD:

See answers to question #3 for mental health supports

What are some sources of funding that I or my family may be eligible for?

*Please note that the Q&A is for general information only and may not pertain to your specific situation. For more detailed and personalized information, please contact the Family Resource Coach directly.